Spaghetti-Harvest in Ticino

Spaghetti-Harvest in Ticino

Spaghetti-Harvest in Ticino

This is an old film of the world famous spaghetti harvest in action in Ticina, Switzerland.

The spaghetti tree film is a famous 3-minute report broadcast on 1 April 1957 by the BBC current affairs programme Panorama.

It told a tale of a family in southern Switzerland harvesting spaghetti from the famous spaghetti tree,

There are specialist plant breeders who have worked for decades on refining the spaghetti trees, so that all of the spaghetti remains in a uniform shape and size.

Most spaghetti trees start life as a cutting that sprouts a root system after being immersed in a small quantity of tomato sauce and then transplanted to the spaghetti grove, where it thrives and grows into a fully grown spaghetti tree.

 

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Serge on holiday in the west of The USA

Serge on holiday in the west of The USA

 

Serge on holiday in the west of The USA

Serge on holiday in the west of The USA – a podcast with a French person who spent 3 weeks travelling around the National Parks in the west of The USA.

Serge flew from Toulouse, France to Denver, Colorado via Paris, Heathrow and Chicago.

Would this type of holiday / trip appeal to you?

Are there any surprises for you, about a holiday in North America?

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Why Do American Accents Sound That Way?

Why Do American Accents Sound That Way?

Why Do American Accents Sound That Way?

Why Do American Accents Sound That Way? Have you ever wondered why accents sound as they do?

Some think that there is such a thing as an American accents, however there are very divers accents all across North American that clearly disprove the idea of a single accent.

There are also many variations among immigrant populations that almost form dialects within the language.

American English (variously abbreviated AmEAEAmEngUSEngen-US), also called United States English or U.S. English, is the set of varieties of the English language native to the United States.

English is the most widely spoken language in the United States and is the common language used by the federal government, considered the de facto language of the country because of its widespread use. English has been given official status by 32 of the 50 state governments.

As an example, while both Spanish and English have equivalent status in the local courts of Puerto Rico, under federal law, English is the official language for any matters being referred to the United States district court for the territory.

The use of English in the United States is a result of British colonization of the Americas. The first wave of English-speaking settlers arrived in North America during the 17th century, followed by further migrations in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Since then, American English has been influenced by the languages of West Africa, the Native American population, GermanDutchIrishSpanish, and other languages of successive waves of immigrants to the United States.

Any American English accent perceived as free of noticeably local, ethnic, or cultural markers is popularly called “General American“, described by sociolinguist William Labov as “a fairly uniform broadcast standard in the mass media”, but otherwise there is not a mainstream standard English of the country, according to historical and present linguistic evidence.

According to Labov, with the major exception of Southern American English, regional accents throughout the country are not yielding to this broadcast standard.

On the contrary, the sound of American English continues to evolve, with some local accents disappearing, but several larger regional accents emerging and advancing.

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What kind of language learner are you?

What kind of language learner are you?

What kind of language learner are you?

What kind of language learner are you?

What kind of language learner are you?
We learn a new language because we want to, or need to communicate with other people either at work or in social situations and some just learn another language for fun.
Everybody learns differently; some people are more visual, auditory, or kinesthetic.
But what are the other qualities needed to successfully learn a new language ?
Intelligence, determination, social skills, risk-taking or a good memory ?
Try this questionnaire to see how your attitudes can affect the way you learn.
We don’t want to put you in pigeon-holed categories, but just highlight some difficulties and some possible solutions.

What type of language learner are you?


 


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Sergeant Podblog investigates The Oil Mystery Episode 2

Sergeant Podblog investigates The Oil Mystery Episode 2

Sergeant Podblog investigates The Oil Mystery Episode 2

Sergeant Podblog investigates The Oil Mystery Episode 2 – in a series of 4 podcasts where Sergeant Podblog investigetes the case of the oil smuggling ring and its boss, who murdered Inspector Whatsisname in cold blood.

Sergeant Podblog investigates The oil Mystery Episode 2 – Sergeant Podblog is called in to solve the case of The murder of Inspector Whatsisname, whose body was found at the foot of Cheddar Gorge, stabbed with a note with the names of three suspects in his hand.

The suspects are :

Suzie, a marketing manager in a frozen snack food company in London.

Reg, the gardner of Lady Sarah Thingymajig from Somerset and Bess who works in sales.

Inspector Whatsisname was just days away from solving the mystery of an international oil smuggling ring, when he met his fate, murdered in cold blood.

No weapon was ever found, but the grammar police, headed by the brilliant detective Sergeant Podblog, have three suspects to interview.

In this second episode, of a four part series, Sergeant Podblog interviews Bess, who turns out to have a habit of making simple mistakes, but does this mean that she could be the murderer?

There was a Bedouin dagger found in her office – was this the murder weapon?

Listen and see if you can spot the mistakes.

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