The food we miss from home part 2

The food we miss from home part 2

The Foods We miss from home part 2 – When living away from home, your tastes change and you learn to adapt to the local food and end up loving it in most cases.

That said, we can still miss some of the food from back home and from time to time, get a craving for those tastes.

Now, I’m not saying that French food is not good – far from it – but no matter how long you are away from home, you still may get a mad desire to eat the foods that you grew up with and this is the theme of today’s podcast.

You may even find that when you eventually get hold of the foods from back home.

You know the ones that you craved, they may have an anti-climax effect on you and you realise that your mind has been playing tricks on you and you don’t really like them as much as you thought you did.

When we first came to France, it was virtually impossible to find any of the food that we ate back in the UK, however, many are now available in bigger cities or where there is a concentration of expats.

At times when we cannot find the foods that we crave, we have the choice to either make them ourselves, where possible, or to substitue French foods for those that we miss.

Examples are making my own clotted cream – a long process, but well worth it!

Substituting ‘Poitrine fumé’ for bacon and using Toulouse sausages in place of English sausages, for when you just cannot go without an English breakfast.

There are certain things that cannot be substituted though, such as Marmite – I mean nothing comes close – although some would question why anyone would seek out Marmite. As Brits, we also miss two favourite British meals ; Indian curry and Fish & Chips.

Fish and chips and curry are available in France, but sorry France, they’re not as good as back in the UK!

The first part is here

The Foods We miss from The UK

The Foods We miss from The UK

The Foods We miss from The UK When living away from home, your tastes change and you learn to adapt to the local food and end up loving it in most cases.

That said, we can still miss some of the food from back home and from time to time, get a craving for those tastes.

Now, I’m not saying that French food is not good – far from it – but no matter how long you are away from home, you still may get a mad desire to eat the foods that you grew up with and this is the theme of today’s podcast.

You may even find that when you eventually get hold of the foods from back home.

You know the ones that you craved, they may have an anti-climax effect on you and you realise that your mind has been playing tricks on you and you don’t really like them as much as you thought you did.

When we first came to France, it was virtually impossible to find any of the food that we ate back in the UK, however, many are now available in bigger cities or where there is a concentration of expats.

At times when we cannot find the foods that we crave, we have the choice to either make them ourselves, where possible, or to substitue French foods for those that we miss.

Examples are making my own clotted cream – a long process, but well worth it!

Substituting ‘Poitrine fumé’ for bacon and using Toulouse sausages in place of English sausages, for when you just cannot go without an English breakfast.

There are certain things that cannot be substituted though, such as Marmite – I mean nothing comes close – although some would question why anyone would seek out Marmite. As Brits, we also miss two favourite British meals ; Indian curry and Fish & Chips.

Fish and chips and curry are available in France, but sorry France, they’re not as good as back in the UK!

Yuka The Healthy Eating App

Yuka The Healthy Eating App

Yuka The Healthy Eating App that checks out the quality of your shopping basket
Do you really know what you eat?
Well yes! With Yuka The Healthy Eating App you can scan your products and analyze their impact on your health.

In the blink of an eye, Yuka The Healthy Eating App decodes complicated and sometimes confusing labels for you: you visualise products that are good and those that are best avoided.

Get personalized recommendations for your shopping
When you scan a product that has a negative impact on your health, Yuka The Healthy Eating App recommends a better equivalent product.

So, you continue to enjoy yourself while eating healthier!

An independent evaluation based on 3 criteria

Nutritional quality
60% of the evaluation is based on nutritional quality, which takes into account the amount of energy, saturated fats, sugars, salt, fruits and vegetables, fiber and protein of the product. The calculation method is based on the Nutriscore (brand of Public Health France), built by Professor Serge Hercberg. 

Additives
30% of the evaluation is based on the presence of harmful additives in the product. Yuka is based on many sources that have studied the dangerousness of food additives, among which are: “Food additives” Corinne Gouget, “Food additives” Maire-Laure André and the studies of the UFC Que Choisir, The French equivalent of ‘Which’ Magazine.

Biological dimension
10% of the evaluation is based on the biological dimension of the product.

Products considered organic are those with the French bio label (AB) and / or the European organic label (Eurofeuille)
Yuka uses the OpenFoodFacts free database.

Yuka The Healthy Eating App is free and available for download to a smartphone – have a look at the Yuka Website.

Molecular gastronomy

Molecular gastronomy

Molecular gastronomy is a subdiscipline of food science that seeks to investigate the physical and chemical transformations of ingredients that occur in cooking.

Its program includes three areas, as cooking was recognized to have three components, which are social, artistic and technical. Molecular cuisine is a modern style of cooking, and takes advantage of many technical innovations from the scientific disciplines.

The term “molecular gastronomy” was coined in 1988 by late Oxford physicist Nicholas Kurti and the French INRA chemist Hervé This.

Some chefs associated with the term choose to reject its use, preferring other terms such as multi-sensory cooking, modernist cuisine, culinary physics, and experimental cuisine, but they often confuse molecular gastronomy (science) and molecular cooking (technique) or molecular cuisine (the culinary trend based on using molecular gastronomy).

Ferran Adria may not be the creator of the term molecular gastronomy (in fact, he dislikes the term to refer to what he does) but he is responsible for the first major revolution in cooking since the nouvelle cuisine insurrection in the 1970s and 80s.

His base of operations is the El Bulli restaurant in northern Spain close to Barcelona which opens only 6 months a year and functions solely as an experimental lab the rest of the time.

Ferran Adria’s creativity and innovations usually arise from asking questions like why do we have coffee followed by an egg at breakfast, while at lunch we eat the egg first and then drink the coffee?

By answering these questions or at least trying, he may discover unusual flavors and aromas that pair well with each other, new ingredients and chemicals and lab equipment that could aid him in the kitchen.

He also learns from the food industry. In many cases, the techniques and chemicals he uses have been applied in the food industry for years but his creativity and imagination allow Ferran Adria to apply them in a new magical way that will surprise diners.

Listen to Susan ask Chris about his passion for cookery and his experiments and experiences with mollecular cuisine.

The Top 10 Healthiest Foods you can eat

The Top 10 Healthiest Foods you can eat

The Top 10 Healthiest Foods you can eat

The Top 10 Healthiest Foods you can eat, health food is food marketed to provide human health effects beyond a normal healthy diet required for human nutrition.

Foods marketed as health foods may be part of one or more categories, such as natural foods, organic foods, whole foods, vegetarian foods or dietary supplements.

These products may be sold in health food stores or in the health food or organic sections of grocery stores, but some healthy foods are not what is commonly regarded as health foods.

If you’re looking for a healthy food don’t go to a fast food restaurants. If you are a veggie lover much better because vegetables can lower blood pressure, reduce risk of heart disease and stroke, prevent some types of cancer, lower risk of eye and digestive problems, and have a positive effect upon blood sugars.

Vegetables and fruits are an important part of a healthy diet, and variety is as important as quantity.

No single fruit or vegetable provides all of the nutrients you need to be healthy.

Some examples of healthy foods are:
• Leafy Green Vegetables
• Mushroom
• Walnuts
• Unprocessed Oatmeal
• Almonds
• Blueberries
• Eggs
• Fatty Fish like Salmon, tuna, trout, anchovies, herring etc.
• Avocados
• Sweet Potatoes
• Broccoli

The consequences of an unhealthy diet

The consequences of an unhealthy diet

The consequences of an unhealthy diet

The consequences of an unhealthy diet – researchers at Virginia Tech have found that veering away from your healthy eating habits for just 5-days could have negative effects on your metabolism and lead to long-term problems like obesity.

The study was particularly small but could be the first step in determining how vacations or family holidays effect the body’s ability to process glucose.

Unhealthy eating is responsible for a plethora of health problems that plague today’s society, and an unhealthy diet is a major risk factor for obesity, nutritional deficiencies and several chronic diseases.

Many people in the developped countries are overfed but undernourished. This means that they eat plenty of food, but the food is often convenience and packaged foods that have been stripped of their nutrients. While this may help keep you full in the short term, it doesn’t provide the nutrients your body needs to stay healthy. Most vitamins and minerals are found in whole foods, such as fruits, vegetables and lean meats. Neglecting to include these foods in your diet can lead to nutritional deficiencies.

It should come as no surprise that obesity is a major consequence of not eating healthy. With the increasing availability of unhealthy foods and convenience foods also came a rise in both adult and childhood obesity. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 35.7 percent of adults and 17 percent of children are obese. Obesity puts stress on every part of your body and increases your risk of developing major health problems, including heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke, liver disease, infertility and sleep apnea.

Obesity is one cause of Type 2 diabetes, but another is unstable blood sugar levels. When you consume a lot of refined grains and sugar-rich foods, your glucose levels spike and drop repeatedly. Over time, these dramatic changes in your blood sugar levels can lead to insulin resistance, which is characterized by a decreased sensitivity to insulin. If this condition is not corrected, it can advance to Type 2 diabetes.

Unhealthy foods are often high in sodium, fat, cholesterol and sugar. Eating these unhealthy foods on a regular basis can increase your blood pressure as well as your cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Over time, high blood pressure and high lipid levels can put a great deal of stress on your heart, increasing your risk for heart attack, stroke and coronary artery disease.

Pin It on Pinterest