The Knowledge: Everything You Need to Know about London Quiz

The Knowledge: Everything You Need to Know about London Quiz

The Knowledge: Everything You Need to Know about London Quiz

Are you thinking of visiting London ? If so, you are not alone ! More than 19 million visitors go to London every year to see the sights and enjoy the London spirit.  Wow ! 

So if you fancy a trip to London where should you start ?

What about the Top Ten places?

  • British Museum – 5.9 million visits
  • Tate Modern – 5.7 million visits
  • National Gallery – 5.2 million visits
  • Natural History Museum – 4.4 million visits
  • V&A Museum – 3.7 million visits
  • Science Museum – 3.3 million visits
  • Southbank Centre – 3.2 million visits
  • Somerset House – 3.2 million visits
  • Tower of London – 2.8 million visits
  • Royal Museums Greenwich – 2.6 million visits

 Some of these sights are free to visit, some you need to pay an entrance fee.

Of course there are many other things to do. What about these …. ?

Walk along the Thames.
Sit in a cosy pub and chat to locals.
Stroll in the parks.
Look at the fashions in Carnaby Street.
Take a selfie in front of Tower Bridge.
Practice English with everyone you meet !! 

So before you book your flight, try this quiz to get a taste of London and learn new vocabulary at the same time.

The Knowledge: Everything You Need to Know about London Quiz

Try these 30 questions to test you knowledge of London, its landmarks, its transport system and its culture.

10 surprising things about Cape Town

10 surprising things about Cape Town

10 surprising things about Cape Town

Do you sometimes go on holiday and are surprised by what you find there? Away from the usual tourist attractions everyday life can be so different from your home town. 

What do you know about Cape Town ?

Politics ? Nelson Mandela was imprisoned for 27 years first in Robben Island and then in other prisons around Cape Town. Since the end of Apartheid Cape Town has become a vibrant melting pot.

Geography ? The landscape is dramatic thanks to the imposing sight of Table Mountain.

Wine ? The land around Cape Town is home to many vineyards producing first class wine.

Shopping ? The shops in the Waterfront centre are some of the best in the world.

The sea ? The dramatic coast line is home to penguins, sharks and whales.

But in this podcast Sue talks about what surprised her about her trip to Cape Town in South Africa.  These photos may help with some of the vocabulary. 

     This is a photo of the Hen Party which surprised Sue. Can you imagine what a Hen Party is and why it was surprising ? Why was the guide cross with these girls? 

  This is the weather down at the Cape of Good Hope. How does Sue describe it?

  What surprised Sue about the statues in Cape Town ?

  This is a poster about the water issue. How many liters of water are people supposed to use a day in order to cut down on water consumption? What exactly is Day Zero ?

  This is a car guard,  what were Sue’s impressions about crime in Cape Town ?

 

 

 

3 Jardins and Palais of Marrakesh

3 Jardins and Palais of Marrakesh

Marrakech is famed for its pink walls and historic buildings and souks, but just as important to the city are its beautiful gardens.
From the lush courtyards of the riads to the expansive formal gardens of its palaces and museums, these green spaces are havens from the hustle and bustle of the city.
Here are Three of those gardens and palaces – Le Jardin Majorelle, Le Palais Bahia and Le Jardin Secret.

The souks of Marrakesh Morocco

The souks of Marrakesh Morocco

The souks of Marrakesh Morocco

The souks of Marrakesh Morocco, Marrakesh has the largest traditional Berber market in Morocco and the image of the city is closely associated with its souks.

The souks are the principal shopping attraction in the city: A honeycomb of intricately connected alleyways,

This section of the old city is a micro-medina in itself, Comprising a dizzying number of stalls and shops that range from itsy kiosks no bigger than an elf’s wardrobe to scruffy store-fronts that morph into glittering Aladdin’s Caves once you’re inside.”

Historically the souks of Marrakesh were divided into retail areas for particular goods such as leather, carpets, metalwork and pottery. These divisions still roughly exist but with significant overlap. Many of the souks sell items like carpets and rugs, traditional Muslim attire, leather bags, and lanterns. Haggling is still a very important part of trade in the souks.

One of the largest souks is Souk Semmarine, which sells everything from brightly coloured bejewelled sandals and slippers and leather pouffes to jewellery and kaftans.

Souk Ableuh contains stalls which specialize in lemons, chilis, capers, pickles, green, red, and black olives, and mint, a common ingredient of Moroccan cuisine and tea. Similarly, Souk Kchacha specializes in dried fruit and nuts, including dates, figs, walnuts, cashews and apricots. Rahba Qedima contains stalls selling hand-woven baskets, natural perfumes, knitted hats, scarves, tee shirts, Ramadan tea, ginseng, and alligator and iguana skins. Criee Berbiere, to the northeast of this market, is noted for its dark Berber carpets and rugs.

Souk Siyyaghin is known for its jewellery, and Souk Smatanearby is noted for its extensive collection of babouches and belts. Souk Cherratine specializes in leatherware, and Souk Belaarif sells modern consumer goods. Souk Haddadine specializes in ironware and lanterns.

The Ensemble Artisanal is a government-run complex of small arts and crafts which offers a range of leather goods, textiles and carpets. Young apprentices are taught a range of crafts in the workshop at the back of this complex.

The symbols of Australia

The symbols of Australia

The symbols of Australia

The symbols of Australia include the flag, national colours, the coat of arms and the national anthem, but there are many other things that make up the symbols of Australia – listen to Sue interview an Australian about the symbols of Australia.

The Australian Flag

The stars of the Southern Cross represent Australia’s geographic position in the Southern Hemisphere. The large Commonwealth star symbolises the federation of the states and territories, and the Union Jack reflects Australia’s early ties to Great Britain.

The National Colours

Australia’s national colours are green and gold, the colours of its national floral emblem, the Golden Wattle.

The Coat of Arms

The Australian coat of arms consists of a shield containing the badges of the six Australian states symbolising federation, and the national symbols of the Golden Wattle, the kangaroo and the emu. By popular tradition, the kangaroo is accepted as the national animal emblem. The Golden Wattle was proclaimed the national floral emblem in August 1988.

National Anthem

Advance Australia Fair has been Australia’s official national anthem since 19 April 1984.

National Day

Australia Day is celebrated each year on 26 January. The date is the anniversary of the unfurling of the British flag at Sydney Cove in 1788.

National Holidays

Australia has 12 public holidays a year, including New Year’s Day, Australia Day and Anzac Day.

An Australian soldier carries a wounded comrade near North Beach, Gallipoli
An Australian soldier carries a wounded comrade near North Beach, Gallipoli (AWM H10363)

DID YOU KNOW?

Anzac Day, 25 April, is a national day of commemoration for all Australians who have fought in wars. It is the day the Australia and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) landed at Gallipoli in Turkey in 1915 during World War I. To mark Anzac Day, Australians and New Zealanders attend ceremonies at home and around the world, including in Gallipoli. In 2015, Australia marked the centenary of the Anzac landing with a ceremony at Gallipoli.

Drawn from the collection of the National Museum of Australia, the Symbols of Australia exhibition explored some of the symbols Australians have chosen to represent themselves and their nation.

Australia — both ancient continent and recent nation — is represented by many symbols. National symbols are often used to represent a distinctive national identity. Some symbols endure, others fade away and new symbols develop as attitudes and values change. Often a source of unity and pride, symbols can also divide and exclude.

The Australian flag is legislated as an official symbol. Others, like the kangaroo and wattle, have changed from popular to official symbols over time. The boomerang was a symbol of the continent long before the nation came into being. In the 20th century, the Sydney Harbour Bridge came to symbolise Australia’s spectacular attractions, while the Holden car became an emblem of the everyday.

Text courtesy of Australian Government department of foreign affairs & Trade

Three items on my Bucket List – Merry

Three items on my Bucket List – Merry

Three items on my Bucket List – Merry

Three items on my Bucket List – Merry came in today to tell us a little about what three things are at the very top of her bucket list.

She is just starting out with learning English and we are both very pleased and grateful to welcome her along to record a podcast at EFL PodBlog.

“Some people die at 25 years old and aren’t buried until they are 75 years old.” Benjamin Franklin

“Every man dies — Not every man really lives.” ~ William Ross

What is a Bucket List?

If you haven’t heard about the term “bucket list”, it is a list of all the goals you want to achieve, dreams you want to fulfill and life experiences you desire to experience before you die, or kick the bucket – hence the name “Bucket List.”

Here is a podcast asking just that question, “What is a bucket list?”

Why Create a Bucket List?

If you don’t live your days by personal goals and plans, the chances are that you will spend most of your time caught up in a the humdrum routine or the rat-race of everyday life.

Have you ever had the feeling that your days and your life is just passing you by in such a rate of knots, without any tangible results to speak about?

What did you accomplish in the past 3 months / 6 months, 12 months, 3 years?

What are your upcoming goals for the next 3 months / 6 months, 12 months, 3 years?

Look at the things you did and the things you’re planning to do next — Do they mean anything to you if you were to die today?

Having a bucket list reminds you of what’s really important in life so you can act on them.

A bucket list helps hone your goals and ambitions into a set of achievable, ‘I-really-want-to-do-this’ steps – now how exciting is that!

It’s just like planning ahead all the highlights that you want to be featured in the rest of your life.

The objective of creating this list isn’t to instill some kind of a race against time or to create aversion toward death. I don’t see our existence to be limited to just our physical years on earth — I don’t see our existence to be limited to just our physical years on earth — our physical lifespan is but a short speck of our existence in the universe.

The whole point of creating your list is to maximize every moment of our existence and live your life to the fullest.

It is a reminder of all the things we want to achieve in our time here on this planet, so that instead of wasting away our time on pointless activities, we are directing our lives fully towards what really matters to us.

Have a look for some ideas on Bucket Lists Here

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